Santa Rally 2017

The Santa Rally describes the tendency of the market to rise in the last two weeks of the year.

In 2017 the FTSE 100 Index had a return of +2.6% in the last two weeks of the year. So the Santa Rally effect held in 2017.

As can be seen in the following chart, the Santa Rally has only failed to deliver in two years since 2000.

Santa Rally [2000-2017]

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Trading around Christmas and New Year

Does the equity market display any particular pattern in the days around Christmas and New Year?

Mean returns

The following chart plots the average daily returns of the FTSE 100 Index for nine days around Christmas and New Year for the periods 1984-2017 and also 2000-2017.

The nine days studied were-

  • Days 1-3: the three trading days leading up to Christmas.
  • Days 4-6: the three trading days between Christmas and New Year.
  • Days 7-9: the first three trading days of the year.

For example, since 1984 the average return of the index on the day before Christmas has been 0.24%

FTSE 100 average daily returns around Christmas and New Year [1984-2017]

Observations

  1. Market strength increases to the fourth day (the trading day immediately after Christmas). Since 1984 the fourth day has been the strongest day of the whole period, with an average daily return of 0.49% (albeit the volatility of returns on this day is high).
  2. Generally the profile of returns for the shorter time range (2000-2017) is similar to that for the whole period from 1984. The one significant difference is that since 2000 the strongest day of the period has been the first trading day of the new year. The new year generally starts strongly on the first day, with performance trailing off the following two days.
  3. The weakest day in the period is the third day of the New Year, followed by the last trading day of the year.

Let’s now see if the pattern of positive returns confirms the above findings.

Positive returns

The following chart plots the proportion of daily returns for the FTSE 100 Index that were positive on the nine days around Christmas and New for the period 1984-2017.

For example, for 84% of the years since 1984 the returns on the day after Christmas were positive.

FTSE 100 positive daily returns around Christmas and New Year [1984-2017]

The profile of behaviour demonstrated by the positive returns is similar to that for the mean returns above.

So, how did equities perform last year around Christmas compared to the average behaviour seen above?

Last year

The following chart replicates the first chart above with the average day returns for the period 2000-2017, and also plots the actual day returns for the nine days around Christmas in 2016.

FTSE 100 Index daily returns around Christmas and New Year

As can be seen, the actual returns last year roughly followed the average pattern since 2000: the strongest days were the days after Christmas and New Year, with performance quickly trailing off after New Year.


Almanac cover - 2018 (small 2)

The above is an extract from the newly published UK Stock Market Almanac 2018.

Order your copy now!

 

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Market behaviour on the days around Budget Day

The United Kingdom used to have have two annual Budgets (what the UK Treasuary calls “fiscal events”), one in the Spring and the other in the Autumn. But from 2017 it is switching to having just one Budget in the year – in the Autumn. The reason is to allow major tax changes to occur annually, before the start of the fiscal year. (Further info on the new Budget timetable can be found on the Treasury web site.)

So, 2017 saw the last Spring Budget, and the Autumn Budget will take place on Wednesday 22 November 2017.

Below we look at the immediate effect of the Budget on three asset classes in the three days around Budget Day:

  1. B(-1): the day before the Budget
  2. B(0): Budget Day
  3. B(+1): the day after the Budget

Equities

The following chart plots the daily returns for the FTSE 100 Index for the three days around Budget Day for the years 2000-2017. For example, in year 2000 the Budget was on 21 March, the day before the Budget the FTSE 100 rose 1.04%, on Budget Day the index fell 0.13%, and on the day after the index fell 0.12%.

Daily returns for FTSE 100 for the three days around the Chancellor's Budget [2000-2017]

GBPUSD

Similar to the above, the following chart plots the daily returns of GBPUSD around Budget Day from year 2000.

Daily returns for GBPUSD for the three days around the Chancellor's Budget [2000-2017]

Gilts

And, finally, the performance of gilts (the 8% Treasury 2021 is taken as a representative gilt) around the budget.

Daily returns for 8 Treasury 2021 for the three days around the Chancellor's Budget [2000-2017]

Summary

The following chart shows the average returns for the period 2000-2017 for each respective asset class for the three days around the Budget.

Average returns for the three days around Chancellor's Budget [2000-2017]

And the following chart shows the proportion of positive returns for the three asset classes in three days around the Budget.

Positive returns for the three days around Chancellor's Budget [2000-2017]

On average since 2000 the equity market has seen mildly positive daily returns on the day before the Budget and on Budget Day itself. But the most significant observation is that equities have been weak on the day after the budget.

On average the pound against the dollar has seen little change on the day before the Budget and on Budget Day itself, but has been strong on the day after the budget.

While, on average, gilts have been weak for all three days, with the weakest day being the day after the Budget.

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Market returns in odd and even weeks

A couple of years ago the Almanac wrote about a strange characteristic of the UK equity market which was the difference in performance in odd and even weeks. The original article is here (see the original article for the definition of odd/even weeks etc.) To recap briefly, the FTSE 100 Index saw much stronger returns in odd weeks than even weeks.

Let’s see what’s happened recently and if this strange characteristic still exists. 

The following chart shows the FTSE 100 average returns for odd and even weeks for the period 2010 to 2017, and also for the individual years 2016 and 2017 (to date). 

Average FTSE 100 returns in odd and even weeks

As can be seen, for the period from 2010 the FTSE 100 has seen on average positive returns in odd weeks and negative returns in even weeks. In effect, for the last few years in aggregate all the growth in the index has been due to its performance in odd weeks.

In 2016, the market on average did see positive returns in even weeks (albeit still less than the odd-week returns). But so far in 2017 the longer-term trend has reasserted itself, with strong odd-week returns and negative even-week returns.

The following chart updates the performance of two hypothetical portfolios: one of which only invests in the market in odd weeks, and the other only invests in even weeks.

Odd v Even Week FTSE 100 Portfolios [2010-2017]

The significant divergence in performance previously observed has continued to today. Having started with values of 100 in 2010, by November 2017 the Odd Week Portfolio would have had a value of 187, compared with a value of 75 for the Even Week Portfolio. The change in value of the Even Week Portfolio has changed little from 2015, whereas the Odd Week Portfolio has grown strongly.

As mentioned in the original article, there is no obvious reason for this weekly phenomenon, although such weekly effects have been seen elsewhere – for example, the FOMC Cycle.

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Average market behaviour in January

The following chart plots the average performance of the FTSE 100 Index during January since 1984.

Average month chart for January [1985-2016]

As can be seen, historically the market tends to rise for the first two or three days in January and then sells off quite strongly over the following two weeks. The second week of January is the weakest week for the market in the whole year. Then, around the middle of the third week, the market has tended to rebound sharply.


Other articles about the market in January.

 

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Last trading day of October

Next Monday will be the last trading day (LTD) of October.

Historically, the last trading day of October has been the strongest LTD of any month in the year. Since 1984 the market has on average risen 0.46% on the LTD of October, with positive returns in 69% of all years.

The following chart shows the FTSE 100 Index returns for every October LTD since 1984.

FTSE 100 last trading day of October [1984-2015]

As can be seen on the chart the market only fell twice on the October LTD in the 19 years from 1984 to 2002. One possible reason for this may have been that November is the start of the strong six month period of the year (this is part of the Sell in May effect), and investors could have been buying equities at this time in anticipation of that.

However, in recent years this pattern of behaviour has changed. Quite dramatically so – in the last seven years the market has only risen once on the October LTD. Last year (2015) the FTSE 100 Index was down 0.5% on the last trading day of October.

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FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 Quarterly Review – June 2016

After market close on 1 June 2016 FTSE Russell confirmed the following changes to the FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 indices. The changes will be implemented at the close Friday, 17 June 2016 and take effect from the start of trading on Monday, 20 June 2016.

FTSE 100

Joining: Hikma Pharmaceuticals [HIK]

Leaving: Inmarsat [ISAT]

FTSE 250

Joining: Ascential [ASCL], CMC Markets [CMCX], Countryside Properties [CSP], CYBG [CYBG], Hill & Smith Hldgs [HILS], Metro Bank [MTRO], Smurfit Kappa Group [SKG]

Leaving: Highbridge Multi-Strategy Fund [HMSF], Interserve [IRV], Jimmy Choo [CHOO], Lookers [LOOK], Melrose Industries [MRO], Northgate [NTG], Ophir Energy [OPHR]

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FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 Quarterly Review – March 2016

After market close on 2 March 2016 FTSE Russell confirmed the following changes to the FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 indices. The changes will be implemented at the close Friday, 18 March 2016 and take effect from the start of trading on Monday, 21 March 2016.

FTSE 100

Joining: Informa [INF], Mediclinic International [MDC], Morrison (Wm) Supermarkets [MRW] and Paddy Power Betfair [PPB]

Leaving: Aberdeen Asset Management [ADN], Hikma Pharmaceuticals [HIK], Smiths Group [SMIN] and Sports Direct International [SPD]

FTSE 250

Joining: Kaz Minerals [KAZ], McCarthy & Stone [MCS], Paysafe Group [PAYS], Softcat [SCT]

Leaving: 888 Holdings [888], Enterprise Inns [ETI], Nostrum Oil & Gas [NOG], Poundland Group [PLND]

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FTSE 100 daily returns heatmap

This updates a previous article with the latest figures for the average daily change and positive daily returns of the FTSE 100 Index.

The table formatting and analysis is largely as before; except the charts now use a smoother gradient of colours to indicate number magnitude.

Average daily returns

FTSE 100 average daily returns heat map [2015]

 Positive daily returns

FTSE 100 positive daily returns [2015]


Other daily return heatmaps.

 

 

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