Monthly seasonality of FTSE 100 Index

Does the FTSE 100 Index display a monthly seasonality?

[We last looked at this in 2014, so time to see if anything has changed.]

Positive returns

The following chart shows the proportion of months that have seen positive returns for the FTSE 100 Index since 1980. For example, the index rose in April in 28 years since since 1980 (76%).

FTSE 100 Index positive returns by month [1980-2016]

Broadly, the pattern of behaviour has not changed greatly in the last two and a half years. The months which have seen the highest number of positive returns are still April, October and December.

But in recent years, since 2000, February has been getting relatively stronger, while January and March relatively weaker. Since 1980, the proportion of positive return months for January is 59%. but measured from 2000 the figure falls to 35%.

Average returns

The following chart plots the average month returns for the FTSE 100 Index for the period 1980-2016. For example, since 1980 average return in January of the index has been 0.9%

FTSE 100 Index average returns by month [1980-2016]

Similar to the previous study, the standout two strong months of the year since 1980 have been April and December. Although since 2000 the performance of December has been dropping off and has been over-taken by October as the second best performing month in recent years.

The months with the lowest (in fact, negative) returns are still May, June and September. Again, things have changed slightly in recent years, with January equal with September as having the worst average returns since 2000.

The following chart is similar to the above (in that it plots the index average returns by month, the short brown horizontal bars), but it adds a measure of the extent of variation away from the average for each month (the measure is 1 standard deviation).

FTSE 100 Index average returns by month (1SD) [1997]

An obvious observation to make is that the variability of returns around the average are very large for all months. The months that have seen the greatest variability (i.e. volatility) have been September and October, and to a slightly lesser extent January. The months with the lowest variabilility have been April and December.

Cumulative returns

The following chart shows the cumulative returns indexed to 100 for each month. For example, £100 invested in the FTSE 100 only in the month of April from 1980 would have grow to £217 by 2016.

This is not meant to represent real-life investable portfolios (e.g. transaction costs are not included), but to illustrate the large effect the returns differences can have on cumulative performance over a long term,

FTSE 100 Index cumulative returns by month [1980-2016]

Notes

  1. The superior returns for April and December can be clearly seen on this chart. Indeed, the close correlation of returns for the two months is remarkable, and rather odd. However, as can be seen, due to the recent couple of weak years for December, performance has been diverging between the the two months.
  2. The most striking change in behaviour is undoubtedly that for January. This was the strongest month for the FTSE 100 Index until the beginning of the millennium, since when its performance has fallen off quite dramatically.
  3. In a less dramatic fashion (than January) the returns for November have decreased strongly since 2005.
  4. The months represented by dashed lines are the six months May to October. These lines can be seen to largely occupy the lower part of chart – which supports the Sell in May effect.
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Monthly seasonality of oil

Does the price of oil display a seasonality pattern?

[We last looked at this in 2014 in this article; time to update the figures.]

To briefly recap, the original study found that since 1986 the price of oil displayed a seasonality for two parts of the year-

  • March-September when WTI is strong, and
  • October- February when the WTI price has been relatively weak

Let’s see if this is still the case.

Mean returns

The following chart plots the average month returns of the price of WTI (West Texas Intermediate) for the period 2000-2016.

Crude Oil (WTI) [2000-2014] Monthly return average

A two-part pattern for the year is still observable, but the periods have shifted slightly.

As can be seen, since 2000, WTI month returns have tended to be high in the period February to June. The strongest month of the year in this period has been February with an average return in the month of 4.8%.

The weak part of the year has also shifted: to September to January. The weakest month has been November, with an average price return of 3.2%.

Positive returns

The following chart plots the  proportion of monthly returns that were positive over the same period.

Crude Oil (WTI) [2000-2014] Monthly return positive

This pattern of positive returns largely supports the preceding analysis.

Since 2002 WTI has seen negative returns in February in only 3 years.

By contrast, September has seen positive returns in only 6 years since 2000.

The new seasonality pattern can thus be summarised as-

  1. February-June when WTI is strong, and
  2. September-January when the WTI price has been relatively weak

Cumulative performance

The following chart plots the cumulative performance of WTI for two portfolios:

  1. WTI (Strong Months) – this holds WTI in just the strong months identified above (February-June), and is in cash for the rest of the year
  2. WTI (Weak Months) – this holds WTI in just the weak months (September-January), and is in cash for the rest of the year

For benchmarking purposes WTI (continuous holding) and the S&P 500 Index are also plotted. All series are re-based to start at 100.

WTI Seasonality Performance [2000-2016]

Starting at 100 in 2000, the WTI (Weak Months) portfolio would have fallen to a value of 16 by 2016. The S&P 500 would have a value of 145, and a continuous holding in WTI a value of 182. But the WTI (Strong Months) portfolio would today have a value of 1047.


Further articles on oil.

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Tuesday reverses Monday

Do market returns on Tuesdays reverse those on Monday?

We first looked at this in 2013 (in this article), so time to see if anything has changed.

First, the following updates the chart to 2016 plotting Tuesday returns for the FTSE 100 Index split by whether the previous day’s returns were positive or negative. Two time periods are considered: 1984-2016 and 2000-2016.

For example, for the longer period, the average return on Tuesday when Monday was up is 0.02%, while the average Tuesday return when Monday was down is 0.09%.

FTSE 100 returns on Tuesdays when Monday was up-down

While the figures have marginally changed from the previous study in 2013, the overall finding is the same: namely that the theory that Tuesday reverses Monday does not seem to hold. Since 1984 it has done so when Monday returns have been negative, but not when they have been positive. 

As in the 2013 study, the theory has been valid for the market since 2000.

The previous study suggested that further analysis might include a filter on the size of the Monday returns. This is done in the following chart, where Tuesday returns are only considered if Monday’s returns were beyond a certain threshold (i.e. of a certain size). The (arbitrary) threshold chosen was 1 standard deviation for Monday’s returns.

FTSE 100 returns on Tuesdays when Monday was up-down (1SD filter)

It can be seen that limiting the analysis of Tuesday returns to just large movements on Monday (i.e. beyond 1 standard deviation) does help the reversal theory. In this case, if the market rises on Monday, then on average it falls the following day (albeit a pretty small average fall), and if the market falls on Monday, the market rises (fairly strongly) on the Tuesday.

Let’s now look at how the theory has been holding up in recent years.

Recent years

The following chart is similar in design to the previous charts, but this time it plots the reversal results for the discrete years 2013 – 2016.

FTSE 100 returns on Tuesdays when Monday was up-down [2013-2016]

First, when the market is up on Monday, all four of the past four years has failed to support the reversal theory as Tuesday has followed with positive returns as well. When Mondays are down, in three of the past four years Tuesdays have seen positive average returns (the exception being 2015).

Exploiting the reversal effect

OK, so how to exploit this?

The following chart plots the cumulative value of a portfolio that invests in the FTSE 100 just on Tuesdays when the previous day saw negative returns. For the rest of the time it is in cash.

In the 2013 study a variant portfolio was also considered, that as well as going long Tuesdays following negative Mondays also went short Tuesdays following positive return Mondays. There’s currently not much point in considering this as the reversal effect is not working for positive Mondays.

So, instead the variant second strategy studied here is as above (i.e. long Tuesday following a negative Monday) but with a 1 standard deviation filter applied to the Monday return (i.e. the strategy only goes long on Tuesday if the Monday negative return is a greater than 1 standard deviation return).

Strategies exploiting the Tuesday reversal effect [2000-2016]

Since 2000 it can be seen that the simple long Tuesday strategy out-performs the benchmark buy-and-hold FTSE 100 portfolio. The variant 1SD strategy only marginally out-performs the simple long Tuesday strategy, but does so with with a greatly reduced volatility.

 

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Day of the week grid

We have previously looked at data to see if there are any discernible patterns in market returns by day of the week. The following table presents another way of studying this.

The table shows the daily returns of the FTSE 100 Index for every day so far in 2016 (up to last Friday, 28 Oct). Positive returns are highlighted in green, negative returns in red. (White cells indicate a market holiday.)

Day of the week grid [2016 wk43]

Observations:

  1. So far in 2016 the longest run of positive (or negative) returns for a day started in the 10th week of the year when day returns for eight consecutive Wednesdays were positive.
  2. For 11 weeks, the day returns on Fridays were the opposite sign to that on the previous day (Thursday). This run ended last Friday (when both Thursday and Friday saw positive returns).

Other articles looking at returns on days of the week.

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The Stock Market in November

November tends to be one of the quieter month for shares. After the sometimes dramatic moves in September and October, and before the traditional end-of-year rally in December, investors seem to take a pause in November. The month currently has the lowest volatility of monthly returns of any month in the year. Of course, this year may be different with the US presidential elections this month.

As can be seen in the accompanying chart, the market used to be strong in November for many years prior to 2005, but since then the market has been more likely to fall than rise in the month and has seen an average month return of -0.6%.

Monthly returns of FTSE All Share Index - November (1984-2015)

An average November

As can be seen in the following chart, on average the market tends to rise the first four days of the month, this could be influenced by investors buying into the market anticipating the strong six-month period of the year November to April (the Sell in May effect). After that the market then gives up those gains over the following few days, rises again, falls back, until finally increasing quite strongly over the final seven trading days of the month.

FTSE 100 average month chart for November [1984-2015]

Shares

In the last ten years the FTSE 350 shares that have performed best in November have been Babcock International Group [BAB], Compass Group [CPG], CRH [CRH], BT Group [BT.A], and Greene King [GNK]; Babcock, Compass and CRH have only had negative returns in November in one year since 2006. An equally-weighted portfolio of these five shares would have out-performed the FTSE 350 index by an average of 5.2 percentage points each year since 2006. While the FTSE 350 shares with the worst November performance over the last ten years have been Vedanta Resources [VED], Royal Bank of Scotland Group (The) [RBS], Tullett Prebon [TLPR], Ashmore Group [ASHM], and Standard Chartered [STAN].

Elsewhere, November has been a strong month for gold and weak for oil and GBPUSD.

Diary

This is a busy month for interim results: 64 companies from the FTSE 350 make their announcements this month.

Dates to watch for this month are: 1 Nov – two-day FOMC meeting starts, 3 Nov – MPC interest rate announcement at 12 noon, 4 Nov – US Nonfarm payroll report, 8 Nov – US Presidential Election, 24 Nov – Thanksgiving Day (US), NYSE closed, and 30 Nov – FTSE 100 quarterly review.

The big event this month will obviously be the US presidential election on 8 November. Analysis of the impact of these presidential elections on the UK market since 1972 shows that on average UK shares tends to trade stronger as the election day approaches, and then tails off in the few days following the election. The strongest day of the period has been the election day itself.

Further articles on the US presidential elections.


Article first appeared in Money Observer

Further articles on the market in November.

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Last trading day of October

Next Monday will be the last trading day (LTD) of October.

Historically, the last trading day of October has been the strongest LTD of any month in the year. Since 1984 the market has on average risen 0.46% on the LTD of October, with positive returns in 69% of all years.

The following chart shows the FTSE 100 Index returns for every October LTD since 1984.

FTSE 100 last trading day of October [1984-2015]

As can be seen on the chart the market only fell twice on the October LTD in the 19 years from 1984 to 2002. One possible reason for this may have been that November is the start of the strong six month period of the year (this is part of the Sell in May effect), and investors could have been buying equities at this time in anticipation of that.

However, in recent years this pattern of behaviour has changed. Quite dramatically so – in the last seven years the market has only risen once on the October LTD. Last year (2015) the FTSE 100 Index was down 0.5% on the last trading day of October.

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Trading days around US presidential elections

How does the UK market trade in the days around US presidential elections?

US presidential elections are held every fours years on the Tuesday following the first Monday in November (hence they are always between 2nd and 8th November). The newly elected president takes office at midday on Inauguration Day (20 January the following year).

In 2016 the US presidential election will take place on 8 November.

The table below shows the results of analysing the FT All-Share index for the 9 days around each US election since 1972.

  • Days 1-4: are the four trading days leading up to the election
  • Day 5: is the election day
  • Days 6-9: are the four trading days following the election
Day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Proportion of days up(%) 45 73 64 55 64 55 45 55 45
Average daily return(%) 0.56 0.33 0.39 0.36 0.64 -0.18 -0.49 0.29 -0.39
Standard deviation 2.45 0.66 1.11 1.05 1.35 0.95 2.09 1.17 1.28

The average return for each day is shown in the chart below.

FTSE All-Share around US presidential elections [1972-2012]

As can be seen, the UK market tends to trade stronger in the four days before the election, and is weaker in the few days following the election. The strongest day of the period has been the election day itself.


The above is an extract from the Harriman Stock Market Almanac.

See also: other articles on politics and markets.

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Which index should you be tracking?

How do you calculate the average performance of a stock market?

This is a harder question to answer than it may at first seem. For example, the FTSE 100 Index is a measure of the aggregate market capitalisation of the 100 companies in the index. The problem is that the index is greatly influenced by the larger companies in it (the five largest companies in the index account for 27% of the total market capitalisation, while the 21 smallest companies in the index account for only 5% of total capitalisation).

So, how representative is the FTSE 100 Index of the average performance of the 100 component companies?

In the following chart the bars shows the proportion of FTSE 100 companies that out-performed the index in each year for the period 2005-2015, and for reference the line plots the index value. For example, in 2005 55% of the FTSE 100 companies out-performed the index.

Proportion of companies outperforming the FTSE 100 Index [2005-2015]

As can be seen there is quite a range of annual behaviour here: in 2007 46% of companies out-performed the index, while in 2012, 77% of companies out-performed. In other words, tracking the FTSE 100 Index in 2012 resulted in under-performing 77% of the individual stock performance. In only year, 2007, less than 50% of stock out-performed the index.

For comparison the following is a similar chart to that above, but this time for the FTSE 250 Index.

Proportion of companies outperforming the FTSE 250 Index [2005-2015]

As can be seen, for the mid-cap index the variability of the proportion of out-performers is far less than for the large-cap index, and the years of individual companies out and under-performance are evenly matched.

A reason for this is that size disparity is greater within the FTSE 100 than the FTSE 250: in the former the largest company has a market capitalisation 47  times greater than the smallest company in the index, the equivalent figure for the FTSE 250 is 10 times.

Equally-weighted indices

In 2015 the indexing company FTSE Russell introduced a new index to address this. The index is called the FTSE 100 Semi Annual Equally Weighted Index, and each of the 100 companies in the index is given a weight of 1% (that is re-balanced every six months).

NB. Deutsche Bank launched an ETF tracking this index, ticker: XFEW).

Such an index is sometimes called a price-weighted index. Before the age of computers it was common to calculate stock indices this way. For example, the FT 30, Dow Jones Industrial Average, and Nikkei 225 were (or are still) price-weighted indices.

If an investor believes that larger stocks will underperform smaller stocks for a period, then switching out of a traditional market-cap weighted tracker (such as a FTSE 100 ETF) into an equally-weighted tracker  may make sense.

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Gold and US presidential elections

How has the price of gold reacted to US presidential elections?

Day returns

The following chart plots the average daily returns of gold for the nine days around the US presidential elections (1968-2012). So, the chart covers the period of the 4 days before the election and the 4 days after. For example, for the 12 US presidential elections from 1968 the price of gold has increased on average 0.2% on the day of the election itself (D0).

Gold and US presidential elections [1968-2012] (1)

As can be seen…well, in fact, nothing much can be seen as there’s no clearly discernible pattern of behaviour here.

Let’s now see if there’s any significant difference in behaviour depending on whether a Democrat or Republican wins the election.

The following chart plots the average daily returns for gold for the election day and four following days. The averages are split as the  average for the five times a Democrat has won compared to the seven times a Republican has won.

For example, in the five elections that a Democrat has won the White House, the average daily return of gold the day following the election (+1D) has been 1.1%.

Gold and US presidential elections [1968-2012] (2)

Generally, the price of gold has been stronger following a Democrat win, and especially strong on the day following the election.

Let’s now zoom out time-wise and look at gold’s month returns around the elections.

Month returns

The following chart shows gold’s average month returns for the three months before, and three months after, US presidential elections.

Gold and US presidential elections [1968-2012] (3)

Historically, the gold price has been weak in the month leading up to the election (-1M) with an average month return of -1.8%. Following the election the price has tended to bounce back, with an average return in the following month of 1.1%.

The following chart plots the proportion of months seeing positive returns in these six months around the election. For example, the price of gold has only risen four times in the month before an election in the 12 elections since 1968.

Gold and US presidential elections [1968-2012] (4)

This chart largely supports the the observation in the preceding chart which is that the price of gold is weak in the month preceding an election, and strong in the following month.

Now to see if there is any difference in the behaviour depending on whether Democrat or Republican wins the White House.

Gold and US presidential elections [1968-2012] (5)

In the month following an election gold has risen on average 1.7% if a Democrat won, and 0.7% if a Republican won. The performance differential becomes more pronounced in the second and third month after the election – with gold seeing month returns of over 4% in the case of a Democrat win, and negative month returns in the case of a Republican win.

Caveat: this analysis involves a very small sample size (there have been just 12 elections since 1968) so the results can not be regarded as statistically significant. But, given that caveat, it does seem that gold loves Democrats!

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